North  
   Carolina
   Business 
   History  

Carriage, Buggy & Wagon Makers

   There were hundreds of builders in North Carolina engaged in making carriages, buggies and wagons — primarily for local markets. These firms were generally small operations. Only a few firms were able to spread their marketing areas around the state.




    
   The dates of confirmed operation are indicated. Actual operation of these firms could and probably did span more years than listed. This list does not intend to list individual workers for coach making firms as this would greatly expand the listing. Additional research is ongoing and will make changes to this listing in the future.
   Among the North Carolina makers of buggies, carriages, wagons and other horse-powered vehicles were:

Abbott's Creek
  
S. W. Wall & Son S. W. Wall & Son, Abbott's Creek (-1896-)  —  wagons

Ahoskie
  
W. S. & J. C. Duke, Ahoskie (-1896-) — coaches

Albemarle
  
Bivens & Co., Albemarle (1877 - ) carriages

Alexandriana
  
Robert Hawkins, Alexandriana (<1877 - ) — carriages

Anderson's Store
  
J. A. & J. Hurdle (1877 - 1896+) —  carriages

Ansonville
  
John Carpenter Wagon Factory, Ansonville (<1884 - 1880s) — wagons

Arden

  
Clayton & Ragan (- 1895 - ) — built and repaired wagons, buggies, etc.

Ashboro
  
Burns & Moring, Ashboro (1877 - ) — buggies
  
B. B. Burns & Co., Ashboro (1877 - ) — wagons, buggies, etc.
 
Asheville
  
J. M. Cornwell, Asheville (April 1841 - ) — He opened a new business (announced April 9, 1841) as a carriage maker.
  
Thomas Stradley, Asheville (1877 - <1890) — carriages
  
Sorrell, Asheville (1877 - <1890) —  carriages
  
J. H. Woody, Asheville (1890> -1896+) — carriages
  
T. S. Morrison & Co., Asheville (1891 -1896+) — wagons
  
J. R. Dickerson, Asheville (<1890 -1896+) — buggies
  
W. D. Justice, Asheville (-1890-) — carriages
  
Van Gilder & Brown, Asheville (<1884) - 1880s) — wagons

Aulander
  
W. D. Hoggard, Aulander (<1890 - 1896+) — coaches

Aurelian Springs
  
Carriages & Buggies, Aurelian Springs (-1896-)

Aurora
  
J. H. Jarvis, Aurora (-1896-) — buggies & carts

Beaver Dam
  
George Sherrill, Beaver Dam (1877 - ) wagons

Bell's Ferry
 
J. H. Hellen, Bell's Ferry (<1890 - ) — coaches and wagons

Bellevoir
  
James Pace (1877 - 1880s) —  wagons

Belvidere
  
J. Robert Parker, Belvidere (1877 - ) —  coaches

Bethania
  
Transou & Stoltz, Bethania (-1896-) — wagons
  
Transou or Transon Brothers, Bethania (-1896-) — wagons

Bethel
  
B. L. F. Barnhill & Sons, Bethel (<1890 - 1896+) — coaches
  
D. S. Leggette, Bethel (<1890 - 1896+) — coaches

Black Creek
  
Anderson & Woodward, Black Creek (1877 - ) carriages and buggies 

Bladenboro
  
H. & T. Pittman, Bladenboro (1877 - <1896) — carriages

Boone
  
J. W. Council & John Allin, Boone (1877 - ) wagons

Brevard
  
W. W. Moore, Brevard (1877 - ) wagons

Brinkleyville
  
Johnson & Pulley, Brinkleyville (-1896-) — coaches

Buchanan

  
William Seat, Buchanan (1877 - 1896+)  — wagon making

Burlington
  
L. J. Fonville, Burlington ( >1891 - 1896+) — buggies, etc.
  
H. A. Vaughn, Burlington (<1884 - 1890s, <1896) — coaches

Bush Hill
  
Blair & Plum, Bush Hill (1877 - ) wagons

Bynum's
  
Johnson & Neal (<1890 -1896+) — carriages

Calhoun
  
John Merrill, Calhoun (1877 - ) wagons

Carthage
  
Tyson & Jones Buggy Company (1850 - 1925) — In 1850, Carthage, NC, merchant Thomas Bethune Tyson (1813 - 1893) bought an existing wagon/wheelwright repair shop owned by Isaac Seawell and his two sons.
   In 1856, Thomas B. Tyson and landowner Alexander Kelly formed a partnership to run the wheelwright business and decided to build carriages. The firm was known as Tyson & Kelly (1856-1858). In 1857, Tyson hired William T. Jones as a carriage painter and shop supervisor. Jones had proved his worth as the enterprise expanded and in 1859, the firm was renamed Tyson, Kelly & Company (1859 1873) with Jones joining Tyson and Kelly as a partner. The popularity of the automobile led to the demise of the Tyson & Jones Buggy Company in 1925. 
Click for more information on the Tyson & Jones Buggy Company.
  
Union Carriage Company (1878 - ) — built carriages in Carthage, NC, for a year or so, then a fire led to relocation of the firm to Cameron; formed by C. E. Jones, A. M. D. Williamson, S. W. Humber and Martin Clary; the firm went into bankruptcy soon after the move to Cameron, NC.
  
R. A. McLaughlin, Carthage (1877 - ) — wagons
  
Thomas Cole, Carthage (1877 - ) — wagons

Carver's Creek
  
Parker Carriages (1877 - ) — carriages

Cary
  
R. J. Harrison, Cary (1877 - ) wagons

Castalia
  
S. Bartholomew, Castalia (1877 - ) — carriages and buggies

Cedar Grove
  
Chas. W. Wynne ( - 1851 - ) — coachmaker

Cedar Hill
  
George Smith Wagon Factory, Cedar Hill (<1884 -1890s, <1896) — wagons

Charlotte

   Morse & Sloan, Charlotte ( - Jan. 1, 1822) — carriages, coaches; partnership with J. G. Morse and ? Sloan.
   J. G. Morse, Charlotte (Jan. 1, 1822 - ) — carriages, coaches; on Trade Street opposite the Theatre. The business included several workmen in addition to Morse.
   Miles Hill, Charlotte ( - December 1829) — carriages, coaches, etc.
   Daniel Button, Charlotte (December 1829 - ) — carriages, coaches, gigs, stage coaches, barouches, etc.
  
Overman & Wilson, Charlotte (<1859 - ) — Built carriages; C. Wilson
  
B. Nicholls, Charlotte (<1877 - ) — carriages and buggies
  
W. S. Warren, Charlotte (<1877 - ) — carriages and buggies
  
Trotter Wilkinson, Charlotte (<1877 - ) — carriages
  
R. C. McCracken, Charlotte (<1877 - ) — carriages
  
J. Trotter, Charlotte (<1877 - ) — carriages

China Grove
  
Casper & Cook, China Grove (1877 - ) carriages
  
J. C. Wilhelm, China Grove (1877 - ) wagons

Clarkton
  
Henry Lindon (1877 - <1890) —  carriages
  
J. W. Hester & Brother(s), Clarkton (<1890 - <1896) — buggies, etc.

Clinton
  
B. R. Hood, Clinton, NC (-1859-) —  manufacturer of carriages, barouches, rockaways and buggies.
  
A. S. C. Powell & Co., Clinton (1877 - ) coaches

Concord
  
George W. Spears, Concord (May 1827 - ) — carriages, coaches, gigs, etc., as well as windsor chairs.
  
M. B. Leslie Coach & Buggy Factory (<1866 - <1890) — carriages
  
W. C. Boyd (1877 - 1896+) — carriages

Conover
  
Bolick Buggy Shop (1870s - ) — carriage maker Jerome Bolick
  
Conover Buggy Co. 
  
M. B. Leslie (-1866) relocated to Concord
  
J. Bolch (<1884 -1896+) — buggies & carriages; was listed in Newton in 1884 as a carriage and buggy maker.

Creston
  
Creston Wagon Works (-1896-) — N. J. Lillard; wagons; 

Durham
  
Durham Buggy Co.  
  
R. T. Howerton & Brother, Durham (1884 - 1896+) —  coaches, carriages, etc.; later operated by C. P. Howerton (-1896-) .
  
Henry Searman & Son, Durham (1884 - ) —  carriages
  
R. D. Zahm, Durham (1884 - ) —  carriages
  
M. Thomason, Durham (1884 - ) —  wagons

East Bend
  
J. G. Huff, East Bend (1877 - ) —  carriages

Egypt
  
R. Frazier Coach Factory (1877 - 1884+) — carriage maker

Elizabeth City
  
Wyatt & Rogerson (-1822-)  — carriages; ad in Elizabeth City Star, March 26, 1822.
  
Watkins and McCoy (-1854-)  — carriages
  
Elizabeth City Buggy Company ( - 1938) — John Quincy Adams Wood, pres. ( - 1932); Walter Pool Wood (1932 - 1938). The company employed about 25 workers at its maximum operations during 1910 - 1912, turning out about 450 buggies a year.
  
John S. Waugh, Elizabeth City (1877 - ) — carriages
  
John Ament, Elizabeth City (1877 - ) — carriages

Elizabethtown
  
A. Renaldi & Co. (1877 - ) — carriages
  
Hester Carriages (1877 - ) — carriages

Edenton
  
James McCoy, Edenton (1877 - 1890+) —  coaches & buggies
  
Baker & Sons, Edenton (1884> - <1896) —  coaches & buggies
  
W. W. Ward, Edenton (<1884 - 1880s) —  coaches & buggies

Enfield
  
Dennis & Horne, Enfield (-1896-) — coaches

Farmville
  
A. D. Hill, Farmville (<1890 - 1896+) — coaches

Fayetteville
  
Nathaniel Morison, Fayetteville (1802 - 1811)  — built coaches; moved to New Hampshire.
  
Neal Graham, Fayetteville (<1820-)  — built gigs, stages, wagons (1820 annual value was $2,000 in vehicles; employed 4 workers)
  
James Boges, Fayetteville (-1820-) — built gigs, stages, etc. (1820 annual production value of $400 in vehicles; employed 7 workers)
  
Archibald Smith, Fayetteville (-1820-) — built gigs, stages, wagons, etc. (1820 annual production value of $3,000 in vehicles; employed 7 workers).
  
Alexander McLauchlen, Fayetteville (early 1820s - March 1823) — built carriages, gigs, barouches, sulkeys
  
Jacob Allen, Fayetteville  (1823 - March 1827) — Built carriages and coaches
  
Zechariah Thigpen, Fayetteville  (April 1827 - ) — Built coaches and gigs; bought out Jacob Allen
  
Alexander McLauchlin, Fayetteville  (1829 - February 1832)  — a coach and iron maker, McLaunchlin sold his coach making operations on Person St., in Fayetteville, to Gardner & McKethan. He continued in active business in other activities, especially making iron equipment for all types of mills.
  
Gardner & McKethan, Fayetteville  (March 1832 - 1866) — Charles T. Gardner and Alfred A. McKethan bought out the coach making business of A. McLauchlin. The new firm built carriages, barouches, buggies, gigs, sulkeys, wagons, etc.
  
A. A. McKethan & Sons, Fayetteville  (1866 - 1896+) — In 1866, Gardner sold his interest to McKethan, who renamed the firm and continued operations, later with his sons.
  
D. P. Barge, Fayetteville  (1877 - <1884) carriage and buggy maker
  
J. W. Hockaday, Fayetteville  (1877 - <1884) carriage and buggy maker
  
J. W. Welsh, Fayetteville  (1877 - 1884+) wagons
  
T. P. Barge, Fayetteville (1884 - ) carriages and buggies

Franklinton
  
J. A. Pitman, Franklinton (1877 - <1896)  — carriages
  
William Dunston, Franklinton (-1896 )  — carriages
  
Allen & Brown, Franklinton (-1896 )  — carriages

Franklinville
   
J. B. Russell & Son, Franklinville (1877 - ) wagons

Gap Civil (Alleghany County)
  
Andrew Osborn (1877 - )  — wagon and buggy maker

Gastonia
  
Stultz & Starns, Gastonia (-1896 )  — carriages, etc.

Gatesville (Gate County)
  
Maxey Haynes, Gatesville (1877 - <1896)  — coaches and harnesses
  
W. H. Standing, Gatesville (-1896-)  — coaches and harnesses

Goldsboro
  
Charles J. Nelson & Co., Goldsboro (1822 - 1856+)
  
R. E. Jones, Goldsboro (< 1871 - 1877+) —  In 1871, R. E. Jones won a U.S. patent for changeable carriage seats. [113,060-March 28, 1871]; buggies and carriages
  
W. H. Borden, Goldsboro (1877 - ) buggies and carriages
  
Allen Moore, Goldsboro (1877 - ) buggies and carriages

Graham
  
J. H. Loy, Graham (-1896-) — buggies
  
W. F. Jones, Graham (<1890 -1896+) — carriages, etc.

Greensboro(ugh)
   Benjamin Overman, Greensborough ( - 1828 - )
— coach, carriage and gig maker, operated a shop with numerous workers
  
Cumming, Hopkins & Rose, Greensboro ( - 1837+) — coach factory
  
William Collins Carriage & Buggy Factory, Greensboro (<1866 - )
  
J. N. Lewis, Greensboro (-1896-) — wagons

Greenville
  
James Nelson, Greenville  (<1847 - 1851+)  coach maker
  
John Flanagan Buggy Company, Greenville (1866 - 1914+) — This concern constructed quality vehicles, comprising carriages, phaetons, surreys and runabouts, both steel and rubber-tired (in later years). Apparently, Flanagan bought an existing carriage factory in October 1883. The company became an auto dealer and continued in business
  
Pitt County Buggy Company, Greenville (<1898 - 1904+) W. R. Smith ran this firm up to 1898, when he was bought out by Charles Cobb, who ran it with H. C. Edwards. The shops apparently burned in 1910 when fire struck Greenville.
  
J. D. Williamson's Carriage Factory, Greenville (<1889 - ) — carriages, buggies, etc.
  
Greenville Carriage Works, Greenville (<1888 -1890) carriages; W. H. Cox started the firm; in 1890 the firm merged with Low Tariff Carriage Factory; ownership became W. H. Cox & L. A. Greene; news reports in 1890 indicated that the firm would be dissolved.
  
Lawrence, Williamson & Co., Greenville (<1890 - ) — coaches and wagons
  
W.W. Haddock, Greenville (1879 - 1883) — coaches; firm burned in 1883.

Gulph (Chatham County)
  
Haughton & Frazier ( - 1851 - ) — coach makers

Hadley's Mills
  
A. B. Chapin & Co., Hadley's Mills (<1884 - 1880s) — wagons & plows

Halifax
  
Underhill, Tompkins & Co. — coach makers; employed 4 people

Hamptonville
  
William H. Brannon, Hamptonville (1877 - ) —  carriages

Haywood County
   
Henry Monso (<1820 - )  —  wagons
   
James Murray (<1820 - ) —  wagons
   
Leonard Cagel (<1820 - )  —  wagons

Henderson
  
Capital Buggy Co., Henderson 
  
Corbitt Buggy Co., Henderson  (1899 - 1907, continued — also see automobiles; 1899 - 1907, converted to automobiles and trucks, ceased in 1952). Richard Corbitt
  
J. A. O'Neil Wagon Making, Henderson (1877 - ) — wagons
   Henderson Buggy Co., Henderson 

Hertford
  
Toms & McMullen, Hertford (1877 - ) —  carriages, coaches, etc.
  
Ward & Morgan, Hertford (1877 - ) —  coaches

Hickory
  
A. S. Abernethy (1877 - 1896+)  — carriages and buggies
  
Piedmont Wagon Company (<1890 -1896+) — wagons; J. G. Hall, president (<1884 - <1896); E. B. Springs, president <1896 - ); H. C. Dixon, secretary; H. D. Abernethy, treasurer; F. B. Alexander, superintendent (<1884 - 1880s); G. H. Geitner, manager (1884> - ). In 1890, the firm had a capacity of 12 wagons a day.

High Point
  
Beeson Brothers, High Point (-1896-) — wagons

Hillsborough
  
William S. Cheek (<1851 - ) — carriages; later John A. Cheek by 1877
  
Charles F. Crabtree (<1851 - 1877+) — coaches, carriages and wagons

Hookerton
  
Henry Cranger ( - 1851 - ) — coachmaker
  
James Moore, Hookerton (-1896-) — coaches

Huntersville
  
J. S. Sassaman, Huntersville (<1877 - ) — wagons

Jackson
  
Joseph N. Seldon, Jackson (1877 - ) —  carriages, buggies and harnesses

Johnson's Mills
  
W. C. Butler, Johnson's Mills (<1890 - ) — coaches and wagons

Jones County
   
Thomas Brown's Manufactory (<1820 - )  —  gigs, etc.; 2 persons employed

Kelford
  
Parker & Brown ( -1896- ) — coaches

Kernersville

  
B Y. Clark, Kernersville 
  
Pendry & Phillips, Kernersville 
   Lewis & Huff, Kernersville (-1896-) carriages & buggies
   Anderson Lewis Carriages & Buggies, Kernersville (<1877 - ) carriages and wagons

Kimbolton
  
John S. Campbell, Kimbolton  (<1884 -1896+) — wagons
   
Kinston
  
Kinston Buggy Co., Kinston
  
Webb Wagon, Kinston (1847 - 1906+) — Started by James B. Webb in 1847 and operated until purchased in late 1870s or early 1880s by Thomas Williams. He resold the firm in 1884 to Webb's son, George B. Webb, who operated it until the early 1900s. 
  
Dibble & Brothers Carriage & Buggy Factory, Kinston  (1850s - 1860s) — owned by James H. Dibble and his brothers, this factory employed as many as 160 workers by 1855. The Civil War and its effects apparently ended this enterprise.
  
C. M. Griffin, Kinston (1877 - ) buggies and more.

Kittrells
  
Joseph W. Perry, Kittrells (1877 - )  —  buggies, wagons and other vehicles.

LaGrange
  
O. H. Pearce, LaGrange (1877 - )  —  buggies and carts

Laurel
  
J. F. Jones, Laurel (-1896 )  — wagons

Lenoir
  
N. A. Powell, Lenoir (<1890 -1896+) — coaches & wagons

Lexington
  
Nathan Brown, Lexington (February 1825 - May/June 1825) — carriages and coaches; located on Main Street opposite Hargrave's store. Brown relocated his business to Salisbury. Brown also made Windsor chairs.
  
H. H. Caudle, Lexington (1884 - ) — coaches

Lincolnton
  
Samuel Lander, Lincolnton (1826 - <1864)  — coach maker and Methodist minister; Main St. East, 2 blocks from Court House; prior to this he was a coach maker in Salisbury (1824 - 1825).
  
Martin C. Phifer, Lincolnton (December 1822- 1829+) — Phifer started out in a partnership with William Culverhouse in Dec. 1822 offering carriage and windsor chair making services. Phifer ran an extensive coach and carriages factory, employing between 15 to 29 workers by 1828.
  
Abner McKoy (McCoy), Lincolnton (<1845 - <1868)  — coach maker; Main St. East, 3 blocks from Court House
  
S. P. Simpson, Lincolnton (<1845-)  — coach maker; street north of Main St., n.w. of Court House
  
Isaac Erwin, Lincolnton (<1845 - 1848)  — coach maker; Main St. West, 2 blocks from Court House; Erwin sells his property to James Cornwell in March 1848; he then moved to Shelby and set up another shop.
  
Abner & R. Garner, Lincolnton (<1845-)  — coach maker; Main St. East End, north side; just Abner Garner in business in 1848
  
E. Blackburn, Lincolnton (<1851 - <1865)  — coach maker
  
James Cornwell, Lincolnton (1848 - <1880)  — coach & carriage maker; Main St., 2 blocks west end, south side corner (took over Isaac Erwin's establish in March 1848, but Erwin still listed as working at that address separately from Cornwell as late as November 1848; Erwin moved and opened a new shop in Shelby in 1849).
  
James L. & L. T. Wilkey, Lincolnton (1865 - ) — buggies and wagons
  
J. R. Blackburn, Lincolnton (1877 - )  —  wagons, etc.
 
Louisburg
  
W. H. Ferguson, Louisburg (<1866 - ) — carriages
  
W. B. Conway, Louisburg (1877 - )  — carriages
  
J. L. Hicks, near Louisburg (1877 - )  —  carriages
  
James Duke, near Louisburg (1877 - )  — carriages
  
William Ridly, Louisburg (1877 - )  — wagons
  
J. R. Harris, near Louisburg (1877 - )  — wagons
  
Joe Murphy, Louisburg (1877 - )  — wagons

Lumberton
  
W. H. Newberry, Lumberton (1877 - ) buggies and carriages
  
J. R. Britt, Lumberton (1877 - ) buggies

Marlboro
  
Dail & Co., Marlboro (1877 - ) — coaches
  
B. F. Tyler, Marlboro (1877 - ) — carriages

Marion
  
Thomas A. R. White, Marion (<1877 - ) — carriages and buggies

McBride's Mills
  
H. L. Huggins, McBride's Mills (1877 - ) wagons

Mocksville
  
Pritchard, Rosenbrough & Co. ( - 1851 - )  coach makers 

Moncure
  
W. J. Bradshaw & Company (<1890 -1896+) — buggies

Monroe
  
C. Austin & Son, Monroe (1877 - ) carriages

Morganton
  
J. H. Coffey (-1896-) — carriages & wagons

Mount Airy
  
William Griffith, Mount Airy (1877 - ) wagons
  
Thomas Lowery & Son, Mount Airy (1877 - ) wagons
  
T. Shaub & Son, Mount Airy (1877 - ) wagons

Mount Olive
 
Oliver Summerlin, Mount Olive (1877 - 1907+) buggies and carriages; he was succeeded by his sons and the firm was renamed Summerlin Brothers.

Mud Lick
  
W. S. Edwards, Mud Lick (<1884 - 1880s) — wagons

Murfreesboro
  
G. W. Hines, Murfreesboro (-1896-) — coaches

Nahunta
   Gill Ward
, Nahunta (1877 - ) buggies and carriages

Newbern (New Bern, Newberne)
  
Robert Hay (late 1790s) — carriage maker
  
G.H. Waters & Sons Buggy & Carriage Factory ( -1896- ) No. 78 Broad St., near the Railroad; Buggies, Carriages, Wagons, and Carts.
  
P. Trenwith (1877 - 1884+) — carriage maker
  
S. Cook & Brother (1877 - 1896+) — carriage maker
  
Luke Mason (1877 - 1884+) — carriage maker
  
Winfield & Sons (-1896-) — carriages

New Hope
  
T. A. Perry, New Hope (1877 - ) —  coaches
  
Alfred Holly, New Hope (1877 - ) —  coaches

Newport
  
S. H. Newberry (1877 - 1896+) — carriage maker
  
J. P. Mann (-1896-) — carriages

Newton
  
J. Baker (1877 - 1880s)  — carriage and buggy maker
  
J. M. Berry (1877 - <1884) — carriage and buggy maker
  
W. A. Scronce (1877 - <1896) — carriage and buggy maker

Old Fort
  
R. H. Moore & Co., Old Fort (<1877 - ) — wagons

Olive Branch
  
J. O. Griffin, Olive Branch (1877 - ) carriages

Oxford
  
Taylor Canada, Oxford (-1896-) — wagons; B. F. Taylor
   S. S. Haithcock
, Oxford (1877 - <1896)  — carriages
  
J. E. Haithcock & Company, Oxford (1877 - <1896)  — carriages
  
Clipper Wagon Co., Oxford (-1896-) — wagons; W. B. Glenn, mgr. (1896)

Pacific
   Joe Young
, Pacific (1877 - )  — wagons

Pactolus
  
J. R. Davenport, Pactolus ( - 1889)  — carriages

Pittsboro
  
A. G. Drake (1890> -1896+) — carriages
  
Isaac Womble (<1884 -1896+) — wagons
  
C. M. Hardin, Pittsboro (<1884 - <1896) — carriages & buggies; listed as Hardin Brothers in 1884
  
Hornaday Brothers, Pittsboro (<1884 - 1880s) — wagons & buggies

Pleasant Hill
  
M. D. L. Harris, Pleasant Hill (1877 - ) —  buggies

Plymouth
  
Hosea Peal or The Old Reliable Carriage Factory, Plymouth (1877 -1889+) — Hosea Peal was the owner. It was reportedly one of the largest business firms in the town.
  
Stewart Ward, Plymouth (1877 - ) coaches

Polkton
  
J. P. Boyt, Polkton (<1884 - <1890) — wagons

Powellsville
  
Raynor Brothers, Powellsville (-1896-) — carriages

Raleigh
  
David Ruth, Raleigh (Oct. 25, 1802 - ) — a carriage and windsor chair maker located in Raleigh.
  
Thomas Hobbs, Raleigh (-1833-) — coach maker (Cobbs?)
  
William F. Clarke, Raleigh  ( - 1861)
  
James Bashford, Raleigh  (1860-1866+) he bought the William F. Clarke shop. Bashford advertised in newspapers distributed statewide.
  
John R. Harrison, Raleigh  (< 1851 - ) coachmaker
  
Willie Johnson, Raleigh  (< 1851 - ) coachmaker
  
Thomas Jenkins, Raleigh  (< 1851 - ) coachmaker
  
John O. Rorke, Raleigh  (< 1851 - ) coachmaker
  
John Myatt, Raleigh (May 1859 - ) carriages and buggies
  
Alfred Upchurch, Raleigh (1877 - ) carriages
  
Robert Greer, Raleigh (1877 - ) carriages and wagons
  
North Carolina Coach Factory, Raleigh (1877 - ) coaches; Noel S. Harp
  
A. H. Temple, Raleigh (1877 - ) carriages and wagons
  
T. J. Jenkins, Raleigh (1877 - ) wagons
  
Narcisse Plumadore, Raleigh (1877 - ) wagons

Rich Square
  
E. P. Copeland, Rich Square (1877 - ) —  coaches

Robbinsville
  
W. C. Morgan, Robbinsville (-1896-) — wagons

Rocky Mount
  
Moore & Fulford, Rocky Mount (<1866 - 1878+) M. Fulford continued to build carriages and buggies after the firm of Moore & Fulford dissolved.
  
T. J. Hackney& Co., Rocky Mount (1877- ) carriages and harnesses
  
Hackney & Company, Rocky Mount (1877- ) carriages and buggies
  
W. H. Flowers, Rocky Mount (-1896-) — wagons and carts 
  
Hussey Brothers & Co., Rocky Mount (1877 - ) — buggies and carriages

Salem
  
Jacob Christman, Salem (Feb. 2, 1824 - ) — maker of coaches, gigs, sulkeys, stages,, post-stages, wagons, etc. The business was located on Salt Street.
  
J. P.  (later became the George E.) Nissen Wagon Works, Salem  
(1834 - 1925) — sold by 1925 and new owner continued to built buggies until 1948. The founder of the factory was John Phillip Nissen, grandson of Salem's pioneer wagon maker. John Phillip Nissen ran the plant until his death in 1874, when sons Will and George Nissen took over.  George E. Nissen & Company 
  
F. C. Mienung, Salem (-1896-) — buggies
  
H. E. Mennung Carriage Factory, Salem (<1877 - <1896) carriages
  
Spach Brothers, Salem (1856 - 1896+) — William E. Spach; wagons
  
A. Bevel Wagon Manufactory, Salem (<1877 - ) wagons
  
J. A. White Carriage Manufactory, Salem (<1877 - ) carriages
  
C. F. Nissen, Salem (1881 - 1896+) — wagons
  
Chamberlain & Smith, Salem (-1896-) — wagons

Salisbury
  
Henry Baker, Salisbury (1758 - )
  
B. P. Pearson, Salisbury ( - September 1820) — carriage maker.
   A. N. Jump, Salisbury (September 1820 - June 1823) — A former Baltimore craftsman, A. N. Jump rented the shop and tools of B. P. Pearson to open a gig and carriage business, including construction of sulkeys, kittereens, dearborns, etc.
  
Samuel Lander, Salisbury (April 1824 - 1825)  — carriage and coach maker, who later in 1826 relocated to Lincolnton, NC. He built gigs, sulkeys, etc.
  
Cyrus W. West, Salisbury (July 1, 1823- 1829) —West and Francis Pinkston announced that they were taking over the coach and gig making business of A. N. Jump on July 1, 1823. In June 1825, West partnered with Nathan Brown in the firm of West & Brown (until Dec. 20, 1825). West set up a few doors northeast of William H. Slaughter's tavern/inn on Main Street. In 1829, West formed a new partnership (Cyrus W. West & Company).
  
Nathan Brown, Salisbury (June 1825- 1830+) — initially, Brown partnered with Cyrus West in the firm of West & Brown (June - Dec. 1825). Prior to opening in Salisbury, Brown was a carriage maker in Lexington, NC (1825). Brown had a series of partners in building carriages and coaches before conducting his business solo by the end of 1829. His business was located three doors east of the courthouse.
  
Brown & Harris, Salisbury (November 1828 - 1829) — Nathan Brown & George M. Harris formed a partnership to build coaches, carriages, gigs and sulkeys; located three doors east of the courthouse.
  
Cyrus W. West & Company, Salisbury (1829 - March 1831) — carriages, wagons, gigs, etc.; partnership included Cyrus W. West, William T. Blum and George M. Harris; located a few doors northeast of William H. Slaughter's tavern/inn on Main Street.
  
William T. Blum & George M. Harris, Salisbury (March 1831 - late 1831) — carriages, wagons, gigs, etc.; located a few doors northeast of Mr. Slaughter's tavern/inn.
   Harris & Shaver, Salisbury (by January 1832 - ) — carriages, wagons, gigs, etc.; George M. Harris and partner, Mr. Shaver.
  
J. W. Rainey, Salisbury (January 1835 - ) — carriages and coaches; on Main Street between the Mansion Hotel and the Western Carolinian newspaper office.
  
John S. Johnston, Salisbury (<1851 - )
  
Overman & Co, Salisbury (<1851 - )
  
Smith & Barker, Salisbury (<1851 - ) carriages; William M. Barker by himself by 1877
  
Caraway & Saylor, Salisbury (<1866 - ) — coaches
  
W. H. Smith, Salisbury (<1866-) — coaches
  
John H. Earnheart, Salisbury (1877 - ) carriages

Sanford
  
Kelly Brothers, Sanford  (<1896 - ) wagons

Scotland Neck
  
E. K. Hassell, Scotland Neck (<1896 - ) — coaches

Shelby
  
Isaac Erwin, Shelby (1849 - ) — carriages, wagons, coaches; relocated from Lincolnton where he previously had a shop.

Snow Hill
   Moore James & Sons, near Snow Hill ( - 1851 -) — coachmakers
  
McD Pate, Snow Hill (-1896-) — coaches

Sparta
  
J. C. Welch, Sparta   (<1884 - <1890) — carriages
  
W. M. Burhett, Sparta (-1890-) — carriages

Stanly's Creek (Gaston County)
  
W. P. Sherrill, Stanly's Creek (1877 - )  — wagons
  
Abel Stroup, Stanly's Creek (1877 - )  — wagons

Stantonsburg
  
Thomas Condon, Stantonsburg (1868 - ) — coaches

Statesville
  
J. W. Woodward, Statesville (1877 - ) — carriages

Sunsbury
  
T. Parker Coachmaking, Sunsbury (1877 - 1896+)  — coaches & wagons

Sussex
  
Sussex Wagon Works, Sussex (-1896-) — R. L. Pierce; wagons;

Tarboro
  
George MacWilliams, Tarborough, NC (1808 - 1820+) — coaches, gigs, sulkeys; employed 8 workers; est. $4,000 in invested capital (1820 dollars)
  
Tarbora Buggy Co. , Tarboro 
  
Hussey Brothers & Co., Tarboro (1877- 1896+) carriages and harnesses; M. L. Hussey (-1896-)
  
John B. Hyatt, Tarboro — carriages

Taylorsville

  
J. P. Lowance Buggy & Carriage Shop, Taylorsville (1877 - )  — carriage and buggy maker

Tillery
  
W. M. Crump, Tillery (-1896-) — coaches, etc.

Townesville
  
J. M. Bullock, Townesville (1877 - )  —  wagons

Trap Hill
  
Marion McCann, Trap Hill (1877 - ) —  wagons

Trenton
  
Benjamin Askew, Trenton (1877 - ) — coaches
  
James B. Stanley, Trenton, (1877 - ) — wagons

Troutman ('s Depot)
  
Jacob D. & Sidney Troutman, Troutman (1853 - ) — carriage and wagon makers

Turnersburg
  
Holland & Welch, Turnersburg (1877 - ) — wagons
  
John Lazenly, Turnersburg (1877 - ) — wagons

Tyro Shops
  
Fitts & Sink, Tyro Shops (-1896-)  —  wagons

Vienna
  
Transou (or Transon) Brothers Wagon Makers, Vienna (<1877 - 1896+) wagons

Vineland
  
Murdock Frazier, Vineland (<1890 -1896+) — buggies & carts

Wadesboro(ugh)
  
Smith & Minck (?), Wadesborough (<1850 -<1860) built buggies (employed 3 workers in 1850, building 24 buggies a year worth $2,000).
  
L. B. Bennett & Company, Wadesborough (-1860-) built buggies and coaches; located about 1 mile northwest of courthouse.
  
Ruscoe & Bain, Wadesborough (<1850 - <1860) built buggies & coaches; built about 28 vehicles in 1849, also conducted repairs; annual production value of $6,500+.
  
Ruscoe & Caraway, Wadesborough (-1860-) built buggies and coaches; employed 8 - 10 workers
  
Threadgill & Saylor Coach & Buggy Factory, Wadesboro (<1866 - ) — coaches and buggies
  
J. C. McLauchlin, Wadesboro (1877 - <1890) — carriages
  
D. L. Saylor, H. D. Pinkston, Wadesboro (<1884 -1890s, <1896) — carriages

Walnut Grove
  
Hurdle & Hurdle, Walnut Grove ( - 1851 - ) — coach maker

Warrenton
  
William H. Bobbitt, Warrenton (<1850 - 1852) — coach maker
  
Bobbitt & Minotree, Warrenton  (1852/53 - 1856+) — listed as buggy makers in 1856; operated until replaced by Bobbit & Price; William H. Bobbitt, owner.
   Bobbitt & Price Carriage Factory
, Warrenton (late 1850s - 1868) — William H. Bobbitt & John M. Price  operated in a 2-story brick building. The upper story was used for painting and trimming the vehicles, and the lower floor for exhibition and sales room. Carriages and buggies were sold genrally for use in North Carolina and the adjoining counties in Virginia. This firm also manufactured the large six-horse omnibus, which ran from Warren Plains to Shocco Springs during the summer season before the Civil War. This omnibus often carrying as many as thirty passengers on top and inside. See successor: J. Wesley Williams & Company.
  
J. Wesley Williams & Company, Warrenton (1868 - 1881) — J. Wesley Williams and William Watson took over the Bobbitt & Price factory, operating it until the building burned in 1881. Coaches and wagons.
  
R. H. Ford & Co., Warrenton (1877 - ) coaches and wagons

Washington
  
Ed Long Coach Factory, Washington, (<1884 - 1896+) — he operated a large buggy & carriage factory, employing between 20 - 25 employees. The factory was located at the corner of Second & Market streets. The Reid & Long Coach Factory was a partnership operating by 1877.
  
T. W. Phillips Coach Factory, Washington (<1890 - <1896) — carriages
  
C. T. Randolph, Washington (<1884 - 1880s) — coaches

Waynesboro
  
C. J. Nelson, Waynesboro (1840s & early 1850s?) built buggies and carriages
  
McKeenan & Co., Waynesboro (-1896-) — wagons

Wentworth
  
S. B. Wray, Wentworth (1877 - ) coaches

Whiteville
  
M. J. Young, Whiteville (1877 - ) —   built wagons and buggies
   W. J. Taylor, Whiteville (1877 - ) —   built wagons and buggies
  
M. Frazier, Whiteville (1877 - ) —   built wagons and buggies
  
J. L. Wiggins, Whiteville (1877 - ) —   built wagons and buggies

Williamston
  
James H. Ellison, Williamston (<1866 - ) — coaches
  
Peal & Pritchard Carriage and Buggy Factory, Williamston (<1866-) — carriages & buggies; J. B. Peal

Wilmington
  
B. R. Hood, Wilmington, NC ( - 1858 - 1859+) —  buggies
  
William Clark & P. C. Felt, Wilmington ( - 1860) —  carriages 
  
P. C. Felt, Wilmington (1860 - ) —  carriages 
  
James A. Lowery, Wilmington (<1871 - 1877+) —  carriages and wagons
  
P. H. Hayden, Wilmington (1877 - ) —  carriages and wagons
  
McDougall & Son, Wilmington (1877 - ) —  carriages and wagons

Wilson
  
Hackney, Wilson (1852 - 1996) — Operated under several variations, most often as Hackney Brothers; last buggy was built in 1918. The firm was converted to truck and school bus body builder. In 1872, the firm was called Hackney & Murray (W. N. Hackney & William Murray; 1872 - 1877+). Peak buggy operations were from 1902 to 1905 with about 6,100 carriages, buddies and other horse-drawn vehicles being built.
  
A. Wreem, Wilson (<1866 - )  — coaches
  
Parker & Murray, Wilson (<1866 - ) — coaches
  
Griffin & Clark, Wilson (1868 - ) — coaches
  
G. H. Griffin, Wilson (1877 - ) carriages and buggies 

Windsor
  
E. J. Mitchell
, Windsor (-1860-) coach maker
   E. S. Dail Buggy Factory, Windsor (1877 - 1896+) — buggy manufacturer
  
Windsor Coach Factory, Windsor (<1884 - 1880s) — coaches

Winston
  
Chamberlain & Smith, Winston
  
J S. White and Son, Winston (<1877 - 1896+)   — In 1877, the firm was listed as E. S. White; carriages & buggies
   S. W. Farabee Wagon Manufactory, Winston (<1877 - 1896+) wagons & buggies
  
Nissen Wagon Co., Winston (-1896-) — S. J. Nissen; wagons

Woodville
  
E. Whedbee, Woodville (1877 - ) —  coaches

Yanceyville
  
B. Lowndes, Yanceyville (1877 - ) —  carriages and buggies







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